Dimanche, André (   –   )


135. Torso
1967 (19h)

   Though Dimanche is identified as a leading sculptor in books on Haitian art, I've found no biographical information about him. The artist's monogram and the date of this work are carved into its base.

     Domond, Urie (1959–   )


72. Marché
c1980 (16x24)

   I met Urie during an extended stay in Jacmel, his birthplace. He pestered me to buy one of his paintings. I didn't much care for any of those he showed me.
   A week or so later he spotted me in a Port–au–Prince gallery and importuned me again. To avoid embarrassing the owner, a friend, I bought this work — for a pittance. It's not bad.
   Urie is said to be a nephew of Wilmino Domond, one of the greats of Haitian art.

     Dubic, Abner (1944–   )


95. Scène rurale
c1986 (36x12)
_

 

   A native of Leogane, Abner Dubic is the most accomplished of a brother and other relatives who paint in a style similar to his. Abner is known for painting the tops, bottoms, and sides of his canvasses — which are mounted on one– to two–inch stretchers. He is a careful draftsman, a restrained colorist, and a superb naïf.
   Dubic has been widely exhibited in the United States and Europe — a 1991 Paris show was sponsored by President and Mme Mitterand — and he is a favorite of the designer Pierre Cardin.

 

144. Wedding Procession
c1995 (24x20)

 

     Ducasse, Gervais Emmanuel (1903–84)


233. Sans Souci
c1974 (24x34)

  The full title of this work is Sans Souci: Palais Résidence du Roi Henri Christophe vers 1815 a Milot. Pasted to the backing of the frame are (1) a letter inviting Ducasse to be an artist–in–residence at Russell Sage College in New York and (2) a copy of a certificate commending him for his work there. Both are dated 1974.

  A Port-au-Prince native, Ducasse came from a well–off family and earned a college degree — unusual for an American in the 1920s, let alone a Haitian. He worked as an agronomist for the government until 1948, when fiscal cuts eliminated his position. Painting, a hobby since childhood, then became his full–time vocation — thanks in part to the recent opening of the Centre d'Arte. Like the Obins and several other Haitian artists, Ducasse wrote the titles of his paintings at their bottoms.

  Ducasse has been widely exhibited and is represented in most important collections of Haitian art.

         

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